Customer Care Center

Knowledgebase

UX, UI, Design, HTML, CSS, JS

This site is used as a knowledgebase for a client’s customer care call centers. Due to its privacy requirements, I am only able to show a compiled wireframe of the site.

When viewing a page on the site, urgent messages will appear if the user has not read those messages. This is an important way for the administrators of the site to deliver timely information, since the employees of the call center do not have email.

The site is consistently structured with utility navigation and search across the top, article taxonomy on the left sidebar, and content to the right. Users can navigate to their desired article by the search feature, or the hierarchical taxonomy navigation in the sidebar.

Search is the main method with which the site is navigated. It features a robust autocomplete with fuzzy term matching. The autocomplete list is ordered by popularity.

When the user hovers over or uses the down arrow to enter an autocomplete item, the search bar updates it’s text to that text, and it changes to a solid color with “Go to” appended to it. This indicates to the user that if they were to click or hit return in that state, they will go directly to that article.

On an article page, the taxonomy (category) that article is in is highlighted. There is also a breadcrumb navigation and last updated date to give the user an indication of its relevance and timeliness. Users can also bookmark pages into collections so that they have easy access to commonly used articles. A related articles list helps users find content that is similar to the article they are currently viewing.

When a user completes a direct search of the site, articles are listed by relevance to the search term.

Users also submit request forms during calls with clients. These are typically materials requests. An administrator to the site has access to a dashboard that displays all the request records. They can view the records individually and mark them as completed as they fulfill them. However, we discovered it was easier for the administrator to be able to export a CSV file for each request type. They use this file to batch process requests within their system.

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